Event Details

Join us in the evening for 4-hours as First in Fright Paranormal shuts the gates and takes you on an intimate journey through the near pitch black darkness of the Henry River Mill Village. This is an exclusive, hands-on paranormal tour that takes you into parts of Henry River that are typically off-limits to other visitors. Prior tours have experienced objects being projected, light anomalies, shadow figures, lights turning on and off, mysterious whistling, and disembodied voices—and that’s just inside and around the Company Store.

If you’re ready to interact with the inexplicable, then the Henry River Mill Village tour with First in Fright Paranormal is for you. The only question remains—can you mentally withstand the full experience?

Must be 18+ years old to attend. Please arrive 30 minutes prior to start time. Gates lock promptly at 8:30pm.


Info on Henry River Mill Village:

There a few places as thrilling at night as the abandoned mill town of Henry River, which is located just south of the town of Hildebran in western North Carolina. Once a thriving textile town, later turn Hollywood movie set, Henry River portrays as much beauty as it does wonder to visitors. Other than the occasional car driving by at night, the over 115 year old village sits in what appears to be pure, rural darkness and silence…but is it really?

The property dates back to the 1860s, when the power of the river was used for logging purposes. In the early 1900’s, Michael Erastus Rudisill purchased the then 1500 acre Henry River plot for $3 an acre, and in 1905, the Henry River textile mill was started and began producing 4,000 spindles of cotton yarn. The company was later transferred from the original shareholders, and D.W. Aderholdt took over as an owner and general manager. After his death, the company was operated by his son, Miles Aderholdt, until it ceased operations.

The Company produced well until the 1960’s, when textiles as a whole began to fall victim to changing markets. By the end of the decade, operations would cease, and the Company would go out of business. What was once a thriving western North Carolina mill town, now lost it's only economic anchor and would eventually experience a coup de grâce with the burning down of the mill in 1977. From that point, with no infrastructure in place, the Village began to slowly lose it’s residents until it was completely abandoned at the turn of the century.

During it’s heyday, Henry River was a place full of life and activity. Residents of the Village would frequent the brick Company Store for all of their household needs, and the Company even used its own currency early in existence, known as Doogaloo. Henry River was a close knit community, and when something was going on in the Village, everyone knew about it in some form or another.

Among these stories is an unforgettable one about the Sheriff that was slain on the Dog Trot, right in the heart of the Village. There are still folks alive today that can share the story of when Sheriff David Oaks was shot and killed on August 21, 1966 while he and his deputies attempted to arrest a textile worker in the Village. While not all of the stories at Henry River have this high of a public profile, this was a textile mill town at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, so things happened. There was no doctor, no police officer, and usually no easy access to a phone to call for help. When things happened at the Village, they happened without much outside involvement or knowledge. To this day, we are still left with uncovering these mysteries in history, but fortunately, many of them like to come out to play at night.